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terris_travelogue:north_island_far_north_easter_2010 [2011/03/07 16:10]
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terris_travelogue:north_island_far_north_easter_2010 [2011/03/07 16:12]
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 ===== Cape Reinga Info ===== ===== Cape Reinga Info =====
  
-The name of the cape comes from the Māori word '​Reinga',​ meaning the '​Underworld'​. Another Māori name is 'Te Rerenga Wairua',​ meaning the leaping-off place of spirits.[4] Both refer to the Māori belief that the cape is the point where the spirits of the dead enter the underworld.+The name of the cape comes from the Māori word '​Reinga',​ meaning the '​Underworld'​. Another Māori name is 'Te Rerenga Wairua',​ meaning the leaping-off place of spirits. Both refer to the Māori belief that the cape is the point where the spirits of the dead enter the underworld.
 [{{  :​terris_travelogue:​cape_reinga_waters_meet.jpg| ​ **The mixing of the waters, Tasman Sea and Pacific Ocean at Cape Reinga**}}] [{{  :​terris_travelogue:​cape_reinga_waters_meet.jpg| ​ **The mixing of the waters, Tasman Sea and Pacific Ocean at Cape Reinga**}}]
  
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 The cape is often mistakenly thought of as being the northernmost point of the North Island, and thus, of mainland New Zealand. However, North Cape's Surville Cliffs, 30 km east of Cape Reinga, are slightly further north. Another headland just to the west of Cape Reinga is Cape Maria van Diemen, which was discovered and named by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman during his journey in 1642 and thought of by him to be the northernmost point of the newly-discovered country he named '​Staten Landt'​. SEE: [[new_zealand_history:​b_abel_tasman|]] The cape is often mistakenly thought of as being the northernmost point of the North Island, and thus, of mainland New Zealand. However, North Cape's Surville Cliffs, 30 km east of Cape Reinga, are slightly further north. Another headland just to the west of Cape Reinga is Cape Maria van Diemen, which was discovered and named by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman during his journey in 1642 and thought of by him to be the northernmost point of the newly-discovered country he named '​Staten Landt'​. SEE: [[new_zealand_history:​b_abel_tasman|]]
  
-according ​to mythology, the spirits of the dead travel to Cape Reinga on their journey to the afterlife to leap off the headland and climb the roots of the 800 year old tree and descend to the underworld to return to their traditional homeland of Hawaiiki-a-nui,​ using the Te Ara Wairua, the '​Spirits'​ pathway'​. At Cape Reinga they depart the mainland. They turn briefly at the Three Kings Islands for one last look back towards the land, then continue on their journey.+According ​to mythology, the spirits of the dead travel to Cape Reinga on their journey to the afterlife to leap off the headland and climb the roots of the 800 year old tree and descend to the underworld to return to their traditional homeland of Hawaiiki-a-nui,​ using the Te Ara Wairua, the '​Spirits'​ pathway'​. At Cape Reinga they depart the mainland. They turn briefly at the Three Kings Islands for one last look back towards the land, then continue on their journey.
  
 A spring in the hillside, Te Waiora-a-Tāne (the '​Living waters of Tāne'​),​ also played an important role in Māori ceremonial burials, representing a spiritual cleansing of the spirits, with water of the same name used in burial rites all over New Zealand. This significance lasted until the local population mostly converted to Christianity,​ and the spring was capped with a reservoir, with little protest from the mostly converted population of the area. However, the spring soon disappeared and only reappeared at the bottom of the cliff, making the reservoir useless. A spring in the hillside, Te Waiora-a-Tāne (the '​Living waters of Tāne'​),​ also played an important role in Māori ceremonial burials, representing a spiritual cleansing of the spirits, with water of the same name used in burial rites all over New Zealand. This significance lasted until the local population mostly converted to Christianity,​ and the spring was capped with a reservoir, with little protest from the mostly converted population of the area. However, the spring soon disappeared and only reappeared at the bottom of the cliff, making the reservoir useless.
terris_travelogue/north_island_far_north_easter_2010.txt · Last modified: 2012/04/07 21:24 by art
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