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new_zealand_history:e_latest [2011/04/27 09:56]
art
new_zealand_history:e_latest [2012/04/07 20:50] (current)
art
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 ===== Far to the south ===== ===== Far to the south =====
  
-{{:​new_zealand_history:​william_blighl.jpg ​ |}} **Willaim Bligh**+[{{:​new_zealand_history:​william_blighl.jpg ​ |}}**Willaim Bligh**
  
 The sub-antarctic islands that are part of New Zealand’s territory were discovered both by British naval vessels, in the South Seas as a result of growing British imperial interest in the region, and by sealers and whalers. Captain William Bligh of the Bounty discovered the Bounty Islands in 1788, and Captain Henry Waterhouse of the Reliance located the Antipodes Islands in 1800. A whaling captain, Abraham Bristow, came upon the Auckland Islands in 1806, and a sealing captain, F. Hasselburgh,​ discovered Campbell Island in 1810. The sub-antarctic islands that are part of New Zealand’s territory were discovered both by British naval vessels, in the South Seas as a result of growing British imperial interest in the region, and by sealers and whalers. Captain William Bligh of the Bounty discovered the Bounty Islands in 1788, and Captain Henry Waterhouse of the Reliance located the Antipodes Islands in 1800. A whaling captain, Abraham Bristow, came upon the Auckland Islands in 1806, and a sealing captain, F. Hasselburgh,​ discovered Campbell Island in 1810.
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 These commemorations were a fitting postscript to the story of the European discovery of New Zealand. Equally fitting, as a reminder that the land they ‘discovered’ had already been inhabited for several centuries by Māori, the country’s highest peak bears two official names: **Aoraki and Mt Cook.** These commemorations were a fitting postscript to the story of the European discovery of New Zealand. Equally fitting, as a reminder that the land they ‘discovered’ had already been inhabited for several centuries by Māori, the country’s highest peak bears two official names: **Aoraki and Mt Cook.**
  
-{{:​new_zealand_history:​mt_cook.jpg|}} ​+[{{:​new_zealand_history:​mt_cook.jpg|}}
  
 From http://​www.teara.govt.nz From http://​www.teara.govt.nz
  
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new_zealand_history/e_latest.txt · Last modified: 2012/04/07 20:50 by art
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